Fast Forward

A Call for Tactile, Contextual Music Discovery—Hello Shazam?

Wouldn’t this be great to apply to music discovery?!FastForward

An excerpt…

Take…mind mapping (conceptual and topical) and Google Earth-style contextually visual discovery—and combine them within an app that employs the tactile, multi-touch interface of a tablet such as the Apple iPad to get a…discovery application structured as a contextual map that permits hyper-focusing on…topics of interest through screen gestures.

Certainly something to explore.

And what happened to Syntact—a clever idea for “band in the hand” tactile music remixing and manipulation?! It may not replace actual musical or technical skills for artists yet it does provide possibilities for creative interaction. Maybe we’ll hear more after their presentation at the NAAS conference in Slovenia today. To be continued.

Source: CreateDigitalMusic.com

 

The future of searchable sound is here and it’s called PopUp Archive

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FastForwardThis is the amazing work of two exceptional young women

Pop Up Archive makes sound searchable using cutting edge speech-to-text technology…”: tagged, indexed and transcribed.

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They are “…helping journalists log dozens more hours of tape than they could ever hope to transcribe themselves — and…helping listeners find the best moments in their favorite podcasts.

Read much more about what they are doing and the impact they are having here and here.

What a treasure! Follow Anne WoottonBailey Smith and 

And support @WomenWhoCode.

And So, You May Ask, Where’s the Money? Tech and the Continual Music Stream, Part 7

Notes to self from the conference presented by NYU’s Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music, November 7th, 2014.

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Stream-Tech Music Conference

Session: Keynote Closing Remarks

Presenter: Mike Errico (Adjunct Faculty, The Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music)

Here comes the reality check.

Making music for its sake and only to be heard is not a financial model of sustainability. I’m not critiquing the purity of being creative and connecting to yourself, the world and the cosmos through music; that is a sanctified act not to be denigrated. But in terms of making a living as a musician there has to be more than creation for its own sake alone. For survival in the biz, it requires licensing (synchronization to film and videos) to align it with ancillary products or services and defined income streams. Merch (music-speak for merchandising) is also good. Then there is touring, but I’m jumping a little ahead of myself.

From the keynote speaker’s remarks and others at this conference twas heard that as far as having your works of sound art on music streaming sites and apps, any music licensing service — subscription or otherwise — is not going to pay back the music creator. Musicians receiving checks for one cent, literally, from Spotify and the like for getting their music played many thousands of times are running jokes among those who are not Taylor Swift, a precious observation made by Mike Errico. A million plays or more might crack the dollar ceiling.

The modes of distribution in the digital realm are far more fracturing than past modes yet, as Mr. Errico noted, there are a multiplicity of new opportunities when you open yourself to looking beyond conventional routes. But you have to be enterprising, tenacious, and fairly innovative. Hopefully, if you have what it takes to write a great song then you may already possess these qualities and only need to refocus your gaze through the other end of the lens. Or partner with those who can.

It is worth noting that Errico deftly and hilariously pointed out (you really had to be there) anyone who says touring is where musicians need to be to make their money has never actually been on tour(!) Its a slog; it can be dangerous for innumerable reasons, not least of which he noted is being able to maintain health insurance; and once off the tour–five minutes after, I believe Mike cited as the exact moment–the income stream, that fabled fount of wealth to be found on the road, is all but over. Hey, sign me up.

Note that I have done my best to accurately represent my experiences, interpretations and impressions. These are my words and transcribed notes and are not the verbatim ideas of the presenters unless quoted directly within the text. Therefore, the conference’s participants should not be held accountable for any misstatements of fact or intention that may occur on these pages.

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What Do You Have to Say for Yourself? Tech and the Continual Music Stream, Part 6

Notes to self from the conference presented by NYU’s Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music, November 7th, 2014.

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Stream-Tech Music Conference

Session: Infiltrating Blogs, the New Powerhouse: Overview, strategy, and practical insight and advice on how to tap into these powerful platforms

Presenters: Jeff Rabhan (Chair, The Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music); Jesse Kirshbaum (CEO, NUE/SoundCTRL), Jon Cohen (Co-CEO, Cornerstone; Co-Founder, The FADER, Inc.; Co-Founder, FADER Label).

According to Jon Cohen of Cornerstone and Fader, here’s what it takes for blogs to serve both its own interests as well as those of musicians:

  • Blogs can help people to focus their discovery of new music.

  • Attune to and strive for less chatter, meaning be lean and focused.

  • “Find your partners and commit…and go deeper with them. Who can you build fresh relationships with,” not who is already out front.

  • A social profile is important. Build it, develop it—because that’s how you get the notice that will bring people back to your hub.

  • “We write about what we like” and that builds trust with your audience. It bears repeating: write about what you like, not what you don’t like.

  • The evolution will continue to be all about mobile—it’s still what’s on our phones that matters.

SoundCTRL‘s Jesse Kirshbaum indicated…

  • A hit record cannot carry its own water. It requires a fair amount of hype, which comes from being able to deliver and connect outside of that core entity.

Note that I have done my best to accurately represent my experiences, interpretations and impressions. These are my words and transcribed notes and are not the verbatim ideas of the presenters unless quoted directly within the text. Therefore, the conference’s participants should not be held accountable for any misstatements of fact or intention that may occur on these pages.

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IND Music Network to the Rescue: Tech and the Continual Music Stream, Part 5

Notes to self from the conference presented by NYU’s Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music, November 7th, 2014.

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clive

Stream-Tech Music Conference

Session: “The video streaming companies – and the marketplace for musicians”

Presenter: Brandon Martinez (Co-Founder & CEO, INDMusic)

Brandon Martinez is a humble and laudable figure in guiding artists through the rough and tumble world of marketing oneself in the wide world of music. Here are just a few things he said that I noted for myself.

  • Make sure your video marketing content on YouTube is compliant for its Content ID.

  • Link with your Google+ account to optimize positioning for YouTube, as a self-verifying process.

  • The first three lines of your video description are crucial to establishing effective SEO. The first ten keywords are for tagging related to the work itself; the second ten are bout you as the artist. Prioritize these.

  • Vimeo does not have the same capabilities to claim, track and monetize video content.

  • YouTube has partnered with SoundCloud to share content ID technology in order to track music metadata across platforms.

  • Read the YouTube Music Playbook Guide.

Thanks to Brandon and IND Music Network for being a friend to musicians. 🙂

Note that I have done my best to accurately represent my experiences, interpretations and impressions. These are my words and transcribed notes and are not the verbatim ideas of the presenters unless quoted directly within the text. Therefore, the conference’s participants should not be held accountable for any misstatements of fact or intention that may occur on these pages.

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